Physics entries win first and second prize in the Faculty/Staff Category and first prize in the Student Category in the Art of Science Competition.

Physics entries win first and second prize in the Faculty/Staff Category and first prize in the Student Category in the Art of Science Competition. The UC San Diego Science and Engineering Library received 44 amazing images. "We were impressed by the variety, creativity and the scientific story behind each of the entries!"

All of the images will be displayed in the S&E Library beginning Friday, May 27, and continuing through the summer. Please stop by and take a look. They will also be posted on the S&E Flickr page next week.

And the winners are...

Faculty/Staff Category
1st place - Tadel Matevz, Physics
2nd place - Adam Burgasser, Physics
3rd place - David Rideout, Mathematics


Student Category
1st place - Rick Wagner, Physics
2nd place - Christopher Doran, ECE
3rd place - Kim Wright, MAE
Honorable Mention - Alireza Kargar, ECE

ChaOss Begets Order I. (1st place - Tadel Matevz, Physics)

The image shows a Z-boson decaying into electron-positron pair inside the Compact Muon Selenoid (CMS) detector at CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, Switzerland. The event was produced as a result of lead-lead ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider and is in fact one of the first events in the world where Z-boson production was observed in heavy-ion collisions. The two opposite, dominant red towers show energy depositions of the electron and positron in the electro-magnetic calorimeter of CMS while other smaller red and blue towers represent the energy deposited by remaining low-energy particles in the electro-magnetic (red) and hadronic (blue) calorimeters of CMS.

Stellar Orbits Dragonfly (2nd place - Adam Burgasser, Physics)

Everything in the Universe moves. Moons, planets, stars, even whole galaxies careen through the cosmos, carrying us along. These motions tell us about the origins of celestial objects, how they have evolved, and the medium of matter, dark matter and dark energy they move through.

In my research, I study our nearest brown dwarf neighbors - very low-mass, low-temperature stars they are a "mere" 10-50 light-years away. These stars orbit our galactic system - the Milky Way Galaxy - along many paths that reveal their diverse ages and origins. The image shows the orbital paths of 200 such brown dwarfs based on data collected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, projected to show radial and vertical motions. Some of the orbits are clustered, indicating stellar groups that orbit around the Milky Way together; others are very wide, indicating old stars that are just passing through the Solar Neighborhood.